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RAVENNA / EMILIA ROMAGNA

The cuisine of our region is very diverse and rich in first courses of filled puff pastry, both with meat and vegetables. The recipe that unites all Romagnoli and tourists, for its simplicity which allows enjoying it in the numerous kiosks of the province, is our “Pieda” (dialectal name). Its characteristic is to be unleavened bread with its typical thin shape. From the popular consumption of a product that required only water, flour, and salt, over time it has been enriched with many variations, including cured meats, cheeses, mushrooms, and all kinds of sauces on top. Spoon desserts are also always a guarantee, such as the zabaione cream where you can dip our Byzantine tiles.

SUGGESTED BY BISCOTTI BIZANTINI

CASALE MONFERRATO / PIEMONTE

Rice alla Monferrina is more than just a simple dish: it’s a journey through time, a tale of traditions and love for the land. It’s the symbol of genuine cuisine, celebrating the encounter between man and nature, between fieldwork and the conviviality of the table. After patiently cooking Monterrino sausage with onion, celery, and carrot in a pan with melted butter, lightly toasted rice is added to enhance even the slightest nuances. The next step is in the vegetable broth, which, with slow cooking, allows it to absorb all the flavors. We also recommend having a grater on the table for a generous sprinkle of Parmigiano Reggiano.

SUGGESTED BY GENTILE BRUSASCA

SILVANO PIETRA / LOMBARDIA

From our farming traditions, born of hard work in the fields demanding great physical energy, comes a typical dish known as “Brasato al Barbera”. This recipe consists of a piece of good beef, along with onions, carrots, celery ribs, and of course, a bottle of Barbera, the ruby wine that carries the character and soul of the local vineyards. The preparation of the brasato begins the evening before, when the meat is placed in a large bowl surrounded by roughly chopped vegetables and aromatic spices, generously poured over with Barbera wine. The next morning, the meat, drained from the marinade and carefully dried, is lightly floured and ready to be seared to achieve a golden crust. When serving, remember to slice it into very thin pieces to fully savor its flavor.

SUGGESTED BY BIRRA CHIARO DI LUNA

SCANSANO / TOSCANA

In our vast and unspoiled lands of Maremma, one of Tuscany’s most iconic dishes is born: Acquacotta, a rustic soup composed of simple and genuine ingredients carefully gathered from the garden and henhouse: tomatoes, onions, celery, extra virgin olive oil, and Tuscan bread. In a large terracotta pot, finely chopped onions are sautéed in extra virgin olive oil. Carrots and celery are added to bring sweetness and freshness, while garlic enriches the base with its intense aroma. Juicy red tomatoes are added to the sauté. Pure water, poured with slow and precise movements, transforms everything into a soup that simmers gently, blending the aromas and flavors.

Fresh eggs, collected from the henhouse, are delicately cracked over the bread. Their egg white solidifies slightly while the yolk remains creamy, a golden heart that holds the promise of a nourishing and comforting meal. The hot soup, generously poured, cooks the egg just enough, creating a harmony of textures and flavors.

 

SUGGESTED BY POGGIO LA LUNA

ISSOGNE / VALLE D'AOSTA

It is prepared throughout the Valle d’Aosta and of course also in our district because it is perfect for facing the cold winter days in the mountains. I’m talking about “Zuppa alla Valdostana”, rustic and hearty, based on local ingredients such as Fontina cheese and classic vegetables like onions, carrots, potatoes, all combined with sliced rye bread. It is cooked in broth, usually vegetable, which spreads an inviting and irresistible aroma in the air, best enjoyed with a glass of red wine from our valleys.

SUGGESTED BY PRIOD

CITTA' DI CASTELLO / UMBRIA

One of our typical dishes that reflects our love for simple and genuine things is the “torta al testo”, also known as “crescia” in some parts of Umbria. This traditional dish is a kind of focaccia cooked on a stone slab called “testo”. It starts with white flour poured into a large bowl with a pinch of salt and extra virgin olive oil, mixed with the pure water from our springs. The pure water from Umbrian springs slowly combines with the flour, carefully mixed together with a golden thread of extra virgin olive oil, symbolizing the generosity of the Umbrian land.

After heating the “testo” over a lively flame, a soft dough is spread thinly over it by the housewives, who turn it several times until it becomes crispy and ready to be cut in half. At this point, get ready for an explosion of flavors from local delicacies with which we are accustomed to filling it, such as pecorino cheese, prosciutto, or sausage.

SUGGESTED BY FATTORIA CARBOGNANO

GAVI / PIEMONTE

A dish you mustn’t miss trying if you visit our region is definitely the Ravioli di Gavi, named after the family that first created them: the Raviolo family, owners of a historic local inn. The secret of the recipe lies in the “tuccu,” the sauce that envelops and completes these ravioli, performing its magic. In a copper pot, amid the sizzle of oil and melting butter, a fragrant sauté of onion, carrot, and celery comes to life. The golden-browned beef melds with the red wine, which evaporates, leaving behind an intense and complex aroma. Peeled tomatoes join the beef broth, rosemary, and bay leaves, simmering slowly over low heat for hours. Time here is a fundamental ingredient: only with patience can one achieve that dense and rich sauce, echoing traditions passed down through generations. Few know that, due to its aromatic characteristics and connection to the region, the ideal wine to accompany the ravioli is none other than GAVI DOCG. Don’t forget to add it to your table!

SUGGESTED BY FONTANASSA

MONTA' / PIEMONTE

One of our typical dishes from Montà is the “Stuffed Baked Onion”. A delicious and hearty dish that reflects the use of local products and, in general, the culinary tradition of the region. Onions are a widely cultivated vegetable in Piedmont. The recipe involves hollowing out the onions and filling them with a savory stuffing made from minced meat (usually pork), stale bread, eggs, grated cheese (such as Parmigiano Reggiano or Grana Padano), parsley, garlic, and spices like black pepper and nutmeg. Everything is mixed until homogeneous. Once the onions and the filling are prepared, the onions are placed in a baking dish and covered with a light tomato sauce. Slices of bacon or prosciutto can also be added on top of the onions to add additional flavor and tenderness. Finally, the stuffed onions are baked until they are well cooked and the surface is golden and crispy.

SUGGESTED BY NOCCIOLAR

PONTE DELL'OGLIO / EMILIA ROMAGNA

We call it “La torta d’erbi” because it represents the best way to showcase the fruits of our territory. We prepare it with a variety of wild aromatic herbs that we gather in the fields and forests of the Val di Nure. We carefully select the herbs, respecting the rhythm of the seasons, especially chard leaves, wild spinach, borage, and nettles, which give the preparation a vibrant flavor waiting to be discovered. We immerse them in a soft embrace of eggs and cheese, with which they harmoniously blend, creating a enveloping texture and a flavor full of authenticity. This cake, the heart of the local culinary tradition, tells ancient stories and secrets kept in the tales of grandmothers, bringing to the table the essence of the Val di Nure itself. Once baked, the “torta d’erbi” is sliced ​​to offer moments of authentic joy and pleasure to the palate.

SUGGESTED BY GIOVANNI BIGNAMI

OLTREPO'PAVESE / LOMBARDIA

The Brasadè recipe from the Oltrepò Pavese, known since the 1800s, is undoubtedly a classic. The name comes from the double cooking process, with the first step being boiling and the second being in the oven. They have the typical ring-shaped form, obtained from a dough for sweets without leavening. All of them are made through a manual process that has been passed down through generations. This popular dish is traditionally made into a necklace of eleven pieces, with five of them facing in one direction and the other six in the opposite direction. When passing through our villages, it’s easy to find Brasadè festivals in the town squares.

SUGGESTED BY POGGIO ALESSI

ALBA / PIEMONTE

The cuisine of Alba can satisfy a wide range of tastes and the most discerning palates with its traditional Langhe dishes:

The classic and renowned “tajarin” all’uovo, similar to tagliatelle but thinner, with a width of 2/3 mm, prepared with a generous amount of eggs that give them a sunny yellow color.

Beef “Fassona” tartare, finely chopped with a knife. Fassona is a highly prized cattle breed raised in Piedmont and is chopped with a knife to preserve its excellent qualities.

Traditional dishes that pair perfectly with the king of the Langhe region, “Il Tartufo” (truffle).
The “Tonda Gentile Trilobata delle Langhe” hazelnut, known as the “queen” of hazelnuts. It can be enjoyed as a fruit, used to make
Gianduja Cream, or in the typical Hazelnut Cake. It can be savored as is or accompanied by cream or zabaione (a traditional Piedmontese custard made with egg yolk, sugar, marsala, or another sweet liqueur).

SUGGESTED BY TARTUFI AL MASSIMO

SAN MINIATO / TOSCANA

S. Miniato’s cuisine is immersed in the broader and rich world of Tuscan cuisine. However, the local cuisine manages to maintain its own distinct identity, primarily due to the white truffle of S. Miniato. This key ingredient in the cuisine enhances the aroma and flavor of both the first courses and the classic and timeless Tuscan Florentine steak.

SUGGESTED BY BCONCINI WINES

RAVENNA / EMILIA ROMAGNA

During the holidays in Ravenna, Passatelli are a must on our family tables. This simple recipe results in a delicious dish made from cheese, eggs, breadcrumbs, and a spice commonly used in Emilia-Romagna, including certain types of desserts: nutmeg. After preparing the mixture, it is passed through a potato masher with large holes. Cooking them in meat broth completes this traditional dish, which is one of our favorite soups.

SUGGESTED BY NERO FERMENTO

BASSANO SUL GRAPPA / VENETO

One of the most appreciated products of our agriculture is Bassano asparagus. With these asparagus, we typically prepare a risotto with a delicate and unforgettable flavor for those who are passionate about good food. We use Carnaroli rice, which is added to the cooking process along with a mixture of asparagus flavored with onion and butter, seasoned with salt and pepper in vegetable broth. A sprinkle of Grana Padano cheese is a must when serving in the dish.

SUGGESTED BY ANTICO LABORATORIO S. GIUSEPPE

URBANIA / MARCHE

Its location as a hinge between Romagna and the Marche regions makes our cuisine a continuous blend of recipes from the north and central Italy while maintaining its own local characteristics. We emphasize the simplicity of peasant life in our first courses and in the preparation of both pork and beef dishes, not to mention rabbit-based dishes. One of the most renowned dishes is Carpaccio of Marchigiana beef with white truffle. The recipe is straightforward, but the secret lies in the choice of ingredients, including lean beef using fillet, lemon, salt, extra virgin olive oil, and, of course, the white truffle from Acqualagna, one of the products that make our region famous.

SUGGESTED BY MUZIGHIN

MONTI SIBILLINI / MARCHE

If you love local village festivals with their liveliness and the sense of community they convey, you can come to Amandola for the Fregnacce with olive oil and pecorino cheese festival. It’s one of our local dishes from the peasant tradition. The preparation begins with fresh puff pastry made with eggs, flour, and water, which is then cut into small squares or sometimes triangles. The classic Marche version is seasoned with tomato sauce and meat ragù, but here we like to serve them with extra virgin olive oil from our olive groves and our mountain pecorino cheese, freshly grated and placed directly on the pasta to enhance its roughness and flavor to the fullest.

SUGGESTED BY APICOLTURA COLIBAZZI

PERUGIA / UMBRIA

Grilled meat has always been one of the most appreciated traditional dishes on the tables of Umbrian homes and restaurants, with meats from sheep, pigs, and, of course, cattle. Our beers, Santachiara, Alzabove, and Santommaso, are the perfect companions for these dishes.

SUGGESTED BY BIRRIFICIO PERUGINI

MONZA / LOMBARDIA

The Cassœula with polenta, which is said to have originated in our area, tells the story of a Spanish soldier who, in order to win over a cook, taught her the recipe, which she made a success of. Now it has fully earned its place as the most representative dish of Brianza and is made with polenta, savoy cabbage that has been frosted by the frost, giving it a crunchier texture, with the less noble parts of pork, and loganega sausage, which is also typical of our area. The name has an assonance with the casserole in which it is cooked, but it also comes from the cassoueu, which is the particular spoon used to mix the ingredients.

SUGGESTED BY BLACKMOUTH SPIRITS

IMPERIA / LIGURIA

One of the most typical recipes from our coastal villages, with an ancient history as it was already present in the local cuisine since the 1300s, is the Sardenaira. It’s a focaccia covered with tomatoes, sardines from our sea, Taggiasca olives, and garlic. We also call it Pissalandrea to recall the name of the illustrious Andrea Doria. Another dish that represents our land is Panissa, a very simple and tasty recipe made from chickpea flour and water. After cooking the mixture, it is left to solidify, and then it is cut into small strips to be served on slices of bread.

SUGGESTED BY DINO ABBO

AREZZO / TOSCANA

One of the favorite local dishes among the people of Arezzo is the famous “Braciolona.” It is a traditional Tuscan dish made with pork, herbs, and spices. Braciole all’aretina is renowned for its intense and succulent flavor. The combination of aromatic herbs, garlic, and grilled pork imparts a unique and Arezzo-specific taste to this dish. It is a local specialty that represents authentic traditional Tuscan cuisine and will certainly satisfy the palates of meat lovers.

SUGGESTED BY MALERBA

BOLGHERI / TOSCANA

A recipe that is not just a recipe but a true event involving the whole village is the “Wild Boar’s Head in the Castagnetana Style.” A recipe that, to be served on the table, requires the expertise of several individuals, starting with a skilled butcher who can precisely separate the head using an art passed down through generations. Then, it moves on to someone with appropriate space to hang it from the ceiling for a few days, allowing it to bleed, before removing it and starting to season it with… continue

SUGGESTED BY GIORGIO MELETTI CAVALLARI

L'AQUILA / ABRUZZO

Lamb with cheese and eggs is a traditional delicacy from the Majella region, characterized by a combination of intense and succulent flavors. Typically, we use the lamb shoulder or leg. After seasoning the lamb with garlic, pepper, salt, and olive oil, we let it marinate in the refrigerator overnight. The next day, we roast it in the oven and prepare the cheese and egg sauce, mixing it until it becomes a smooth cream. After the lamb’s cooking time has passed, we pour the sauce over the meat in the baking dish. We put everything back in the oven for another fifteen minutes until the sauce has slightly thickened and turned golden. This dish is usually served with seasonal vegetables or roasted potatoes as sides.

SUGGESTED BY TERRA DEI BRIGANTI

LONA / TRENTINO ALTO ADIGE

SALTED OR SMOKED MEAT. Processed meat, to be consumed raw or cooked, obtained from the hindquarters of various animals such as swine, horse, donkey, wether, goat, deer, or roe deer, with a characteristic and aromatic scent, tender when sliced, and a beautiful, bright red color. If subjected to smoking, it is called “Smoked Meat,” which appears externally darker and has the characteristic scent and flavor of smoked products. The meat portions used, weighing about 1-2 kg for beef and horse and much less for other species, are placed in special containers and sprinkled with a dry brine composed of salt, black pepper, juniper berries, bay leaves, cinnamon, and cloves, all moistened with white wine. After resting for at least 20 days, it is then placed in special rooms for a brief aging process. Any smoking is done in special rooms using vine or beechwood sprinkled with juniper needles.

SUGGESTED BY CANTINA MICHELI

VERCELLI / PIEMONTE

A dish from our countryside tradition that we’d like to introduce you to is the Panissa Vercellese. “THE MIXED FRY PIEMONTESE” consists of sweet (amaretti, apple, and semolina) and savory (steak, sausage, brain, marrow) fried foods, paired with a sauce, but only upon request from the gourmets. New variations add chocolate semolina, Pavesini biscuits in the sweet portion, and meatballs, perhaps with some zucchini in the savory part.

SUGGESTED BY RISO IN FIORE

ALBA / PIEMONTE

We’d like to introduce you to one of our typical dishes that you will always find on the tables of the people from Alba: “tajarin al tartufo bianco d’Alba”, during the months from October to December when the truffle is at its peak of freshness and flavor. Tajarin is a variety of fresh pasta similar to spaghetti, but thinner and hand-cut. It is made with flour, eggs, and sometimes a pinch of salt, and its consistency is soft and delicate.

The white truffle of Alba, on the other hand, is one of the culinary treasures of the region, a precious mushroom with an intense aroma and a unique flavor. It is mainly harvested in the woods around Alba during the autumn season.

To prepare the dish, fresh tajarin is cooked in salted water until al dente. Meanwhile, a simple sauce is prepared with butter and freshly grated truffle. When the pasta is ready, it is drained and dressed with the truffle sauce. Some chefs also add a bit of cream to make the sauce creamier.

SUGGESTED BY PASTA D’ALBA

SANTA DOMENICA TALAO / CALABRIA

Ingredients for 4 people.
500 g of durum wheat semolina
Water as needed
Equipment.
1 dried cane with a diameter of 3 centimeters and a length of 30 cm
1 millerighe frame comb
Preparation.
Knead the flour, gradually adding water until it becomes homogeneous and easily detaches from the hands.
Let it rest for 30 minutes.
At this point, shape the dough into small pieces and roll them out on a flat surface, then gently pass them over the millerighe comb.
For the seasoning.
500 g of tomato puree
10 cl of extra virgin olive oil
A handful of basil
2 Diavolicchio Diamante chili peppers
100 g of Calabrian pecorino cheese
Preparation.
Cook the tomato sauce, adding the chili pepper once the sauce is cooked. Once the pasta is cooked, mix it with the sauce and finish with the pecorino cheese.

SUGGESTED BY PANE MATTRASAU

ALTAMURA / PUGLIA

I mustaccioli, dolce tipico natalizio, ha molte varianti regionali, tra cui quella pugliese, dove viene aggiunto del vin cotto per renderli ancora più morbidi. Tra le varianti regionali, c’è anche quella altamurana, dove oltre agli ingredienti classici e il vin cotto, viene aggiunto anche un goccio di Padre Peppe per restituire il gusto dolce e l’aroma intenso dell’elixir. I mustaccioli sono dei dolci tipici della tradizione che vengono solitamente sistemati in cestini e sacchetti da donare a familiari e amici.

SUGGESTED BY PADRE PEPPE

ALESSANDRIA / PIEMONTE

In the heart of the Piedmont countryside, where the hills gently wrap around the ancient villages, lies a culinary treasure jealously guarded by the shepherds of Alessandria: the Rabaton dei Pastori. Its origin is probably linked to the passage of nomadic shepherds returning with their flocks from the mountain pastures. For this reason, it is a simple recipe that has varied its ingredients over time. To prepare the Rabaton, one must begin with the careful selection of the most genuine and local ingredients. The base of this dish is represented by ricotta, herbs or spinach, egg, breadcrumbs, flour, aromatic herbs, and nutmeg, which give the recipe an intoxicating aroma and a rich, intense flavor. With patience and skill, the Rabaton dei Pastori cooks slowly over the fire, allowing the ingredients to blend and meld together, creating a dish that is more than just a simple combination of flavors: it is an ode to the land and its generous riches, a tribute to the simple and authentic life of the Piedmontese shepherds.

SUGGESTED BY MAMU

BORGOMARO / LIGURIA

We’d like to suggest a recipe that originates from our meadows because it’s made with wild herbs that can be foraged in the hills surrounding Borgomaro, such as nettles, dandelion, wild chard, and burnet. In our dialect, all these herbs together are called ‘preboggion,’ from which the recipe gets its name, ‘Pesto di preboggion.’ In addition to the herbs, you’ll need slightly toasted pine nuts, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and a generous sprinkle of Parmesan cheese. Once everything is thoroughly blended, you can put it in a blender to obtain an extraordinary pesto to dress pasta or spread on some fragrant Ligurian bread crostini.

SUGGESTED BY LE2MELE

TUSCANIA / LAZIO

Because our love is for the countryside, we want to suggest a simple but delicious dish rooted in peasant traditions: L’Acquacotta. Acquacotta is a traditional soup mainly composed of vegetables and basic ingredients cultivated in our fields, such as onions, garlic, olive oil from Tuscia, tomatoes, chili, combined with eggs and, of course, grated pecorino cheese. If you enjoy bruschetta, consider adding stale bread. The recipe may vary from family to family, providing an additional reason to discover it during one of your travels in our area.

SUGGESTED BY LA RISERVA BIO

MULAZZO / TOSCANA

The testaroli with pesto is a traditional dish of Lunigiana’s cuisine, a historical region located between Tuscany and Liguria. Testaroli are a kind of flat and thick pasta, shaped like circles or squares, prepared with a simple batter made of wheat flour and water. The peculiarity of this pasta is that it is cooked on a hot plate called “testo” or “testi” (hence the name “testaroli”).

SUGGESTED BY IL GRADILE

TON / TRENTO

Our family memories cannot trace back to the origin of a typical dish passed down from generation to generation, which we call “tortel di patate”. A dish that embodies the authentic soul of our generous land.

Tortel di Patate is a simple yet sumptuous creation: layers of grated potatoes mixed with white flour. The whole is slowly cooked in a baking dish spread with peanut oil in a wood-fired oven, until the outer crust becomes golden and crispy, while inside, the potatoes transform into a soft embrace of flavor. Each bite is a sensory journey through green fields and alpine meadows, a tribute to the simplicity and authenticity of mountain life.

SUGGESTED BY DISTILLERIA FEDRIZZI

PAVIA / LOMBARDIA

In Pavia, we celebrate a delicious culinary specialty that embodies the essence of our local products: Risotto alla Bonarda. This dish skillfully combines two treasures of our region: Carnaroli Classico rice and Bonarda from Oltrepò Pavese. The recipe is elegantly simple, featuring rice, finely sliced leeks, and Bonarda wine, diluted with water to create a delicate broth. It’s enriched with extra virgin olive oil or butter and completed with Parmigiano Reggiano. Our experienced cooks toast the rice for a few minutes before adding it to the pot with the wine, which has been boiling for about fifteen minutes. After cooking, the risotto rests covered with a traditional linen cloth, awaiting the final vigorous touch before being served at the table, as we wish each other bon appétit.

SUGGESTED BY DI CRISTIANA

CHIETI / ABRUZZO

Among the hills and mountains that watch over Chieti, a culinary treasure wrapped in tradition is revealed: the “scrippelle ‘mbusse”. A love song to Abruzzese cuisine, these thin fritters are like pages of an ancient manuscript, narrating stories of fertile lands and captivating flavors.

Their creation begins with a dance of flour, eggs, and milk, a symphony that gives life to a silky batter, destined to rest under the generous gaze of time. In a pan, like an artist painting their canvas, the scrippelle take shape, delicately browning until they become crispy works of art.

In the heart of the preparation, a meat broth, fragrant with ancient tales, warmly welcomes the scrippelle. Parmesan, like stardust, settles on the surface, while an egg, a symbol of life, dances gently on the fritter.

Served in bowls, the scrippelle ‘mbusse are a symphony of textures and flavors. The egg, like a shy poet, allows itself to be admired, adding a touch of creaminess to the broth that envelops each bite. An ode to tradition, a culinary tale that connects the past with the present, a taste of Chieti that enchants the senses and warms the soul.

SUGGESTED BY DAVIDE IACOVELLA

APPIGNANO DEL TRONTO / MARCHE

The most typical dish of our region is definitely “olive all’ascolana.” It’s a recipe that you absolutely must try if you come to visit us. It consists of pitted green olives, stuffed with a mixture of ground meat, cheese, eggs, and spices, then breaded and fried. This dish is renowned throughout Italy and beyond, and is often served as an appetizer or snack. It’s an icon of Marche and Piceno cuisine in particular.

SUGGESTED BY CONCA D’ORO

PIVERONE / PIEMONTE

A recipe that never fails to appear on our tables, especially during the winter months, is “Bagna Cauda”.
Bagna Cauda is a warm sauce made with garlic, anchovies, and extra virgin olive oil, traditionally served in a bowl placed at the center of the table. Seasonal vegetables such as carrots, celery, peppers, cauliflower, and cardoon are dipped into the sauce and consumed after being soaked.
The preparation of Bagna Cauda involves slow cooking garlic in olive oil until it becomes soft and aromatic, then adding anchovies and letting them completely dissolve into the sauce. The final consistency should be creamy but not too dense. Bagna Cauda is a very convivial and tasty dish, perfect for sharing moments with friends and family. It is a true symbol of the culinary culture of Canavese and Piedmont, celebrating the authenticity and richness of local flavors.

SUGGESTED BY BUEMI VINI

MONZA / LOMBARDIA

Cassœula with polenta, a dish that hails from our region, is said to have been brought by a Spanish soldier who, in his efforts to win over a cook, taught her the recipe that eventually became a success. Now, it has rightfully earned its place as the most representative dish of Brianza. It is made with polenta, cabbage leaves that have been touched by frost, giving them a crisp texture, the less noble parts of the pig, and the Loganega sausage, which is also typical of our region. The name has a similarity to the “casseruola” (casserole) in which it is cooked but also to the “cassoueu,” a particular spoon used to mix the ingredients.

SUGGESTED BY BLACKMOUTH SPIRITS